NEWSROOM

Recognising International Women's Day

March 8, 2019

Svitzer in Australia and around the world recognises International Women’s Day on 8 March 2019 – a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The day also marks a call to action for accelerating gender parity.

Meet a few of the women from our operations around the coast who are part of the team responsible for making Australian ports safer and more efficient.

Click on their photo for more information

Lauren Munro - Newcastle NSW
Kelly Kruger
Kelly Kruger - Fremantle WA
Georgia Terlick
Georgia Terlick - Fremantle WA
Cheree Figg
Cheree Figg - Darwin NT
Tania Lewis
Tania Lewis - Adelaide SA
Michaela Moss
Michaela Moss - Brisbane QLD
Elizabeth Ferrier - Sydney NSW
LAUREN MUNRO

Operations Superintendent, Newcastle, New South Wales

Lauren Munro started at Svitzer (formerly Adsteam) in November 2005 after completing her Coxswain Certificate in 2000. Lauren, who says she has always been drawn to the Maritime industry, now manages a busy shipping schedule in Newcastle, our biggest port, as Operations Superintendent.

What would you say most motivates you to do what you do?

The love of the job, the people and the industry we work in. No two days are the same and there are always interesting challenges to deal with. It’s a great feeling when you are on the foreshore and you see kids and adults getting excited about the tug boats going to or from a vessel.

What are your career highlights?

A career highlight has been the introduction of Active Escort to Newcastle.  We have introduced two escort capable tugs into the port and the introduction of Active Escort to Newcastle has meant Medium Range (MR) and Long Range (LR) tankers can now safely call Newcastle. It’s been a seven year process to get to this point and was a great day when we carried out the first Active Escort in October 2018. 

What are the key habits that you feel make you successful?

Challenging myself, learning from failures, taking constructive feedback well and being dependable.

What’s the most valuable piece of advice you have received in your career and how did it help you?

A former General Manager said to me very early on – “Lauren, you will never know it all”. This has stuck with me over the years and because of those words, I am never afraid to ask for help.

If you could go back in time to the beginning of your career, what advice would you give yourself?

Don’t be afraid to step out of your comfort zone.

Kelly Kruger
KELLY KRUGER

Marine Engineer - Vessel Management, Fremantle, Western Australia

Kelly started with Svitzer in 2014 as Technical Manager for the Gorgon vessels. She recently took on the role of Regional Technical Manager for Australia. Kelly has worked in shipping for over 20 years, beginning her career at sea as an Engineer, before coming ashore into ship management.

What attracted you to Svitzer?

After spending many years working abroad Svitzer offered the opportunity to return to Australia and work within the towage industry, an aspect of shipping I had not yet been involved in, so provided a new challenge.

What would you say most motivates you to do what you do?

Shipping is an exciting and challenging industry; no two days are alike. The industry is diverse, from the people who work within it, to the vessels, the technologies, regulations and operations, and they can change every day. The people who work within this environment are generally dynamic and passionate about what they do.

What are your career highlights?

Finishing my cadetship and getting away to sea. Finishing my very first LNG ship drydocking as a Technical Superintendent- watching a vessel sail away ready for operations — after many, many, many hours of hard work. Receiving the award of Best Overall Student by the Honourable Company of Master Mariners UK when I completed my Master’s Degree.

What are the key habits that you feel make you successful?

Perseverance, Resilience and being open minded to new challenges and ways of doing things.

What’s the most valuable piece of advice you have received in your career and how did it help you?

If you are not willing to do it yourself, don’t ask others to do it! This is a great question to ask yourself for all sorts of reasons. Does it need to be done, why are we doing it, and how does it affect me or others I am working with, having respect for everyone you work with and the roles that they provide.

Were there any key influencers in your life that inspired you to follow your career path?

My Grandfather took me sailing when I was four and I promptly told my parents I was running away to sea when I grew up!

If you could go back in time to the beginning of your career, what advice would you give yourself?

Don’t be afraid of change!

Georgia Terlick
GEORGIA TERLICK

Operations Centre Manager, Fremantle, Western Australia

Georgia Terlick plays a key role interfacing with our customers and crew as our Customer Service Manager, based in our busy West Coast Head Office in Fremantle. She started with Svitzer after a former colleague recommended that she apply for a new vacancy as Operations Officer in Svitzer’s offshore division. At the time, Georgia was working in the Oil and Gas industry and was attracted to the role and the company — her father is a Tug Master and had worked for the company for over 30 years! Georgia says she knew Svitzer to be a reputable, global organisation that she wanted to be a part of.

What would you say most motivates you to do what you do?

I enjoy working with other people that have a focus on embracing all challenges and getting the job done. In Operations you need to be quick-thinking and responsive to the environment at hand. I am also motivated by the people around me who are passionate about the service that our business delivers each day.

What are your career highlights?

There have been a number of highlights, but I haven’t been much prouder than the day that Svitzer held the naming ceremony for the tug – Svitzer Newton, which was named after my colleague, Stephen Newton, who has been employed by Svitzer for over 47 years. The team planned a magnificent ceremony at the Port of Fremantle on World Maritime Day and there wasn’t a dry eye in the house when Steve accepted the honour!

What are the key habits that you feel make you successful?

I feel that relationships are key to success and by building a strong network in your work community, internally and externally, you can leverage the experience of those around you to help support you in your endeavours.

What’s the most valuable piece of advice you have received in your career and how did it help you?

I was once told that you should leave nothing in the tank each day. You can’t ask for much more than doing your best every single day.

Were there any key influencers in your life that inspired you to follow your career path?

My dad has been a Tug Master for the best part of my life and he definitely influenced my desire to work in the maritime industry. His love and passion for working on the water resonated with me from a young age. His work in the industry saw him offered some excellent opportunities and I got to see the fruits of his hard work and commitment to a career in maritime.

If you could go back in time to the beginning of your career, what advice would you give yourself?

Attitude is everything, don’t shy away from work. Be helpful, reliable and consistent and opportunities will come your way.

Cheree Figg
CHEREE FIGG

Port Manager, Darwin, Northern Territory

Cheree Figg was the recipient of a Women in MBA (WiMBA) partnership scholarship and recently completed her Master of Business Administration Degree. Jointly sponsored by Svitzer Australia and the University of South Australia, the scholarship aims to address gender diversity in leadership, support the growth of the female talent pipeline and foster positive economic growth for the nation.

Formerly our Port Manager in Adelaide, Cheree now heads up our Darwin operation as Port Manager.

How did you get your start at Svitzer Australia?

I was working as a ship’s agent and logistics support officer with Asiaworld Shipping for just over five years and was ready for the next challenge.

At the time, the company was still Adsteam (now I’m showing my age), and my husband’s uncle was working as a Tug Master in Newcastle, so I had a little insight to the company. It seemed like an exciting opportunity to do something different to what I was doing and still close to home, which was a bonus while my daughter was young.

I still recall the day I received my old fashioned hard copy printed letter of offer in a package on my door stop. The package contained some newsletters and information, including a DVD showing what the company did, and it made me even more excited to join the team!

What would you say most motivates you to do what you do?

It is a very challenging role providing valuable learning opportunities every day. If I had a dollar for every time someone said to me, ‘We will get to that later when it quietens down,’ I would be rich.

I am motivated by the support the company has provided me for both study and work opportunities, to enable me to continue sharing my knowledge with others in the business.
It helps to stay motivated when you have a supportive manager who allows you to be creative and look for opportunities to apply the knowledge learned to drive success both personally and for the business.

What are your career highlights?

My time with Svitzer has had many career highlights; starting with my career progression from Operations Officer, to Operations Manager and now Port Manager.

Some personal highlights include the thoughtful (and emotional) goodbye I received from the Adelaide team on my relocation to Darwin. The personal ‘Thank Yous’ I have received over the years for support of employees with either their own personal issues or family issues, along with friendships I have created with many employees who I have worked with and remain in contact.

I consider my time managing South Australia as a career highlight, managing more than 100 employees, followed closely by my recent appointment as Darwin Port Manager, allowing a new lens on the industry with two LNG terminals and very different commercial relationships to what I have been involved with previously.

What are the key habits that you feel make you successful?

Transparency to employees, with honest feedback to both crew and management. Network and relationships with internal and external stakeholders. My willingness to learn. My loyalty to the company. A good work ethic and most importantly, embracing empathy!

What’s the most valuable piece of advice you have received in your career and how did it help you?

From memory this one was during EA negotiations in 2015 and has stuck with me since…

The 20/60/20 rule:

  • 20 percent will always be on board (YES),
  • 20 percent will immediately be opposed (NO) and
  • 60 percent can be influenced (MAYBE).

Other advice that has influenced was to read ‘Lean In’ by Sheryl Sandberg and ‘Power to Change’ Thank you, Chapter One by Daniel Flyn.

Were there any key influencers in your life that inspired you to follow your career path?

Key influencers in my life have been some fantastic managers, from Ken Fitzpatrick and Paul Paparella at Asiaworld Shipping who provided me guidance and opportunity to grow, along with very strong support for a female in a male dominated industry. Stephen Hartland, who was my first manager at Svitzer was an absolute gentleman who had the utmost respect for crew and from crew and with 40+ year experience in the company was able to provide me not only guidance and training, but also invaluable historical knowledge of the company and the industry.

If you could go back in time to the beginning of your career, what advice would you give yourself?

Listen to everyone; consider and take time to make decisions (but don’t procrastinate). Embrace change and challenge the status quo. Be strong but show empathy. Most importantly, be prepared to dye your hair early – the Svitzer grey sets in quick!

Tania Lewis
TANIA LEWIS

Operations Superintendent - SA Ports, Adelaide, South Australia

Tania Lewis started with Svitzer as an Operations Officer based in Whyalla, SA. The Whyalla operation revolves around transhipment for the export of Iron Ore and the harbour towage movements for vessels carrying raw materials used in steel manufacturing. Tania now manages shipping operations as an Operations Superintendent in our Adelaide office, in South Australia.

What attracted you to Svitzer?

Growing up in Whyalla, I would always notice the tugs manoeuvring ships in and out of the Whyalla port and later towing barges to and from the Capesize ships in the Spencer Gulf. When I was made aware of a vacancy at Svitzer, I was interested and excited at the possibility of being involved with the operation that plays such a critical part for the main industry in my home town.

What would you say most motivates you to do what you do?

Having a keen interest in the Transport and Logistics industry, my role with Svitzer allows me to further my knowledge, work with great people and be involved in an industry that I’m passionate about.

What are your career highlights?

  • Being a part of the rapid transition and development of the Svitzer Whyalla operation.
  • Relocating from the Svitzer Whyalla operation to the Svitzer Adelaide office and experiencing the different dynamics of the ports in this region.
  • Being appointed to the role of Operations Superintendent for Svitzer SA Ports and the exciting challenges that came along with this opportunity.

What are the key habits that you feel make you successful?

Organisation, constant care in what I do and the people I work with – and always wanting to learn more.

What’s the most valuable piece of advice you have received in your career and how did it help you?

“Be patient with a challenging situation, because you might be surprised with the outcome.”

This piece of advice has helped me to persevere with challenges and strive for a positive outcome in all circumstances despite the obstacles I have experienced along the way.

Were there any key influencers in your life that inspired you to follow your career path?

My Dad, having been involved in the same industry throughout his career, has always been very dedicated and passionate about his work. This inspired me to follow a similar path.

Svitzer Management teams that I have worked with in both Whyalla and Adelaide have been great mentors, and supportive in my development.
The Svitzer Crew I have worked with have shown me kindness and support over the years and the passion they have for what they do motivates me to continue along this career path.

If you could go back in time to the beginning of your career, what advice would you give yourself?

Embrace every challenge and enjoy the journey along the way.

Michaela Moss
MICHAELA MOSS

Training Manager, Brisbane, Queensland

Michaela Moss joined Svitzer Australia recently as our Training Manager. With significant experience in vocational education and training (VET), audit, policy development and legislation, Michaela brings a wealth of knowledge to Svitzer. In her previous role as a senior advisor for the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA), Michaela regularly liaised with the Svitzer Marine Manager about training and certification for domestic and international seafarers.

Why were you attracted to Svitzer Australia?

I was attracted to Svitzer because I have had previous experience in setting up young, post school traineeships in another Tug company many years ago. I also got to deliver part of the training and this is where my true love affair with tug boats started.

The Training Manager role presented a challenge and an opportunity to bring training to the forefront and be an important part of the safety culture.

For me, it was the next step in my career as I moved from a private maritime training consultancy to maritime rescue, to state and then federal government, tourism and then Svitzer as part of a multinational company.

What would you say most motivates you to do what you do?

There are a number of things that motivate me, firstly contributing to people’s skills and knowledge which is an integral part of supporting and increasing safety.

Helping people contribute to the industry on many levels through establishing and identifying career pathways and helping people develop to reach their full potential. Understanding that training and education is all positive and has a happiness and motivation about it, it engenders enthusiasm in people which is great to be part of.

Good training and a skilled workforce also makes sound economic sense and is therefore important to utilise a range of training tools in a way that demonstrates good business practice.

What are your career highlights?

I have been very lucky in my career and have been provided many wonderful and diverse opportunities. The highlights are too many to list as I have loved every opportunity I have been given, but I will list a few special moments:

  • The people I have worked with along the way
  • Marine and helicopter rescue
  • Award for contribution to competency-based training
  • Being the technical editor for the last version of the Small Ships Manual
  • National recognition with opportunities to present at several conferences
  • Contributing to maritime policy and legislation through driving consultation
  • Opportunities to engage across all levels of government, community and industry
  • Helping people embrace learning and follow their career path

What are the key habits that you feel make you successful?

Tenacity. Attention to detail, near enough is not good enough. Seeing all issues ‘problems’ as having a solution and working through all the challenges to reach the final goal. Staying positive and not letting the hurdles on the way stop me working with others to get to the best outcome.

Prioritising, dealing with small issues to help individuals but keeping the big picture in mind and keep moving forward.

 

What’s the most valuable piece of advice you have received in your career and how did it help you?

Engage with technical experts, listen to everything and all advice before making practical decisions. Keep building on all the knowledge and content you learn over years to reach practical, straightforward outcomes.

Keep your ears turned the right way, keep your mind open to good ideas, always consult and keep the outcome simple to interpret and easy to deliver.

This advice helped me to engage in a positive and interesting way with many people on many topics. It gave me the opportunity to see all sides of the story and helped me learn that good decisions are made through the collaboration with others.

Were there any key influencers in your life that inspired you to follow your career path?

My career started with nursing and I spent 10 years in maritime emergency response and rescue. When I was invited to work in government I thought long and hard about how the change could be a positive career progression.

In the end I came to the realisation that I could contribute to helping people in trouble one at a time, or I could contribute to good policy and practice which contributes to reducing or preventing life threatening incidence happening in the first place. I have now spent 10 years with a focus on helping people access skills and knowledge in the maritime industry to promote better and safer practice.

It did take me a while to adjust, but I don’t regret ‘hanging up my gumboots’.

If you could go back in time to the beginning of your career, what advice would you give yourself?

  • Build career long relationships
  • Respect and listen to others, seek advice from those more senior to you
  • Achieve outcomes, keep going until the job is done
  • Don’t shy away from diversity in your career but always demonstrate commitment
  • Be open to opportunities, be versatile and holistic
  • Stay healthy and happy and balance your life and your career
  • Contribute to the community, give back where you can.
ELIZABETH FERRIER

Human Resources and Industrial Relations Director, Sydney, New South Wales

Elizabeth Ferrier is a Human Resources Executive and Workplace Relations Lawyer. She joined Svitzer Australia as Human Resources and Industrial Relations Director in 2018. Elizabeth has had a varied career in the transport and logistics industry, having previously worked at Asciano, Qantas and Patrick Stevedores.

How did you get your start at Svitzer Australia?

I was approached about the role at Svitzer Australia about three years ago now however the timing didn’t work quite right. Funnily enough a couple of years later I heard that the job became vacant. I was really hesitant about getting in touch with Svitzer since I’d pulled out of the process previously and maybe that had reflected badly about me. I try to live by the motto these days of ‘don’t die wondering’ and so I said ‘stuff it they can only tell me to get lost’ and got in touch – and the rest is history.

What would you say most motivates you to do what you do?

Sometimes I feel hugely motivated and that comes from having the opportunity to contribute to a business that performs a critical role within our economy. Sometimes I get really excited by a tricky problem or challenge that you have to wrestle and wrestle with to find a way through, in other words the opportunity to do the sort of stuff that I reckon I’m pretty good at. Sometimes (probably like most people) my motivation completely escapes me and all I want to do is lie on the couch – that’s when I rely on habit.

What are your career highlights?

I was really fortunate to work for a time as General Manager of Industrial Relations with Asciano (which used to be the company that owned Patrick Stevedores and Pacific National Rail). I was part of an HR Leadership Team under our HR Director which was a team of really high performing, diverse insightful professionals. I learnt so much from all of them and being part of that team was a huge highlight for me. When Asciano got taken over and broken up it was a tough time for me – I felt quite bereft and it took a while to get over it. I’m pretty sure I drove my partner nuts during this time.

What are the key habits that you feel make you successful?

Like many people I’ve struggled a bit with my mental health over the years so which at times has sent me off the rails a bit. For this reason I’m pretty committed to the habits that I know keep my brain healthy. I exercise really regularly and keep the booze to a minimum (mostly). I also write lots of lists – but frequently lose them so I’m not sure that that’s a recipe for success.

What’s the most valuable piece of advice you have received in your career and how did it help you?

My dad told me once that that it’s important to be patient in your career because one day you can think there are no opportunities and you’ll never move anywhere, then someone moves on or something else happens and suddenly everything changes. Mind you I haven’t always followed this advice and made a couple of rash career decisions …

Were there any key influencers in your life that inspired you to follow your career path?

I worked for a Judge and Commissioner in what was then the Australian Industrial Relations Commission who really set me on the path of a career in industrial relations. Justice Boulton in particular is a clever, kind and understated man who really understood that the matters he was dealing with were real people who deserved to be treated respectfully. If I hadn’t have worked for those two men I probably wouldn’t have ended up in this career.

If you could go back in time to the beginning of your career, what advice would you give yourself?

Relax. It’s a long career, don’t worry if you’re not moving up the whole time. Take a few right and left turns, get some diverse experience. If that involves moving sideways or backwards for a while don’t let that turn you off.

For more information, please contact:
Nicole Holyer at Nicole.holyer@svitzer.com 
0430199600.